Canada
Adaptation and resilience of territories and ecosystems
Food and agriculture

The ecological corridor of Darlington

This Canadian project aims to design an ecological corridor as well as an urban farm in order to deal with climate change and raise public awareness on biodiversity issues.

An initiative of University of Montreal

Overview of the project

The Corridor Darlington project in a brilliant collaborative initiative between the University of Montreal and the Côte-des-Neiges/Nôtre-Dame-de-Grâce quarter.

This project aims to develop an ecological track between the mountain-based campus of University of Montreal and the new MIL Campus, it will also join up to the eco-area of the Bertrand stream. The initiative has an impact of different aspects of our contemporain reality :

  • Public Health
  • Economic and communitarian development
  • Citizen participation
  • Civic commons
  • Biodiversity and urban farming
  • Diversity
  • Active transport
  • Adaptation to climate change
Objective

To design an ecological corridor as well as an urban farm in order to deal with climate change and raise public awareness on biodiversity issues.

Level of progress

implementation

Qualitative results
  • Bee homes
  • Increase in road security
  • Local food production
  • Beautification of th neighbourhood
  • The breaking down of people’s isolation
Financing

Philanthropy, the neighbourhood, University of Montreal, Volunteers

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About
the organisation

University of Montreal

Research and innovation

website
Stephane Beranger
Sustainable development coordinator
stephane.beranger@umontreal.ca

The Université de Montréal, with its affiliated schools, HEC Montréal and Polytechnique Montréal, is the leading hub of higher education and research in Quebec.

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A project
in collaboration
  • Arrondissement Côte-des-Neiges/Nôtre-Dame-de-Grâce

    Gouvernement local, municipalité

    website
  • SOVERDI (Société de verdissement de Montréal)

    Organisation non-gouvernementale

    website